Issue #27- Interview With David Marquardt

  1. What was your inspiration that lead you to a career in photography? I originally did video work and went to Film school at USC. Decided against internship at various production companies in Hollywood and got a video camera, told people what I was doing and just went into the actual trade. As I gained clients and got work, the clients for video production always needed photography more than video. I was always bringing in Photographers and one of the clients was annoyed with this and said “why don’t we just get you a camera and have you do the shots” So it started, I reluctantly became a photographer, sometimes you are better at something so don’t really want to do more than what you actually want to do.
  2. Was photography a subject you were always interested in? No, it was video production, photography was something I just fell into and realized that I was good at it and made more money being a photographer. 
  3. What advice would you give to someone perusing a career in photography? My experience has been to just take photos. Studying it is also important, but hands on is the best way to learn. Know what you like and find what works. Find the gap between what you’re doing and what you’re seeing. Learn the different techniques and find out what works.
  4. As a photographer what key features of a structure are you looking for? Depends on who I am shooting for. The client lets me know the area of focus of the structure aka the focal point.
  5. How much does professional photography influence a buyer’s decision when buying? A lot! A great photo will get them in the door. Sometimes a good photo can make a house look better than it actually is, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing because it can give the buyer an idea of the potential of that particular home. Some buyers have bought a house sight unseen just because the pictures where so good. 
  6. What percent of your photography requires post-production techniques? 100%
  7. What techniques are the most commonly used? There are basic rules to Architectural Photography, it’s less about being creative and more about “as is”. Sharp lines and balance. Vertical lines must be straight on, so the lines don’t change. Tripods are used for this precision.
  8. How much creative control do you have setting up furniture and accessories before an interior shoot? Again, this depends on whom I am shooting for. Say for instance interior designers, they have everything set up and all they need is a picture of it. In Real Estate sometimes the home needs to be rearranged or the clutter inside the house needs to be cleared away. 
  9. In your photography career, what job or location was most challenging to you? Anything where the expectations are high and when there are lots of windows with dark furniture.

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